When to Use Apostrophes to Make Words Plural

It takes 60 seconds. How will you do?

Test yourself on the following use of apostrophes. It will be easy for some, a challenge for others. (Answers are below.)

The Quiz

  1. Which is the correct way to write the photo caption?

  (a) Here we are at the restaurant with our friends the Johnson’s.

  (b) Here we are at the restaurant with our friends the Johnsons.

  1. Which is the correct way to sign the Christmas card?

  (a) Merry Christmas from the Zimbardos.

  (b) Merry Christmas from the Zimbardo’s.

  1. Which is correct?

  (a) We enjoy watching movies about superhero’s.

  (b) We enjoy watching movies about superheroes.

  1. Which is correct?

  (a) We had hamburgers and French fries for dinner.

  (b) We had hamburger’s and French fry’s for dinner.

  1. Which is correct?

  (a) It’s easy to use apostrophes correctly.

  (b) It’s easy to use apostrophe’s correctly.

The Rule

What’s the punctuation rule? Adding apostrophe + s does not make a word or a name plural. Leave the poor apostrophe out of it. Just don’t do it. Leave it!

But there is one exception to the rule: When writing the plural of a letter, it can be helpful—and is acceptable—to use an apostrophe. For example, “Mind your p’s and q’s“; “Mississippi has four s’s, three i’s, and two p’s.”

The Answers

How did you do? Here are the answers:

1: b    2: a    3: b    4: a    5: a

For further reading on the topic, see my article: Apostrophe Use and Misuse.


© 2018 by Dean Christensen. All rights reserved.