“With That Being Said”: An Annoying Expression

Category: Annoying Expressions

Here’s how an email sent to all employees recently began:

Wow! July is right around the corner. With that being said, attached is the July newsletter for you to read and share. 

“With that being said”? Huh?

It may be too kind to label “with that being said” as a cliché, but it is that at least. It should be labeled a hackneyed term,[1] or better yet, a nuisance. But because I want to be polite, I’ll call it a cliché, and it’s been around for a long time—many years. But lately it seems to be cropping up all over the place. Writers and speakers use it as a ready-made, no-bake transitional statement, along with its shorter cousins “having said that” and “that said.” It’s intended use is to smoothly shift gears from one sentence or one topic to the next, to shoehorn the reader (or listener) into what’s to follow. It’s a throw-away expression, a space-filler, and it generally adds nothing of substance to one’s communications.

I’m picking on this cliché because it seems it’s used typically in formal situations—where the communicator has prepared an oral presentation, a paper, or a correspondence like the above email, in which careful thought was allegedly required. So what can we use to transition from one thought to the next without using this trite expression? Here are a ten examples of common transitional expressions. Which one (or more) of these might work better than “with that being said”?

equally important

in the same way

as a result

consequently

for this reason

therefore

hence

in any event

meanwhile

however

And perhaps the best transitional statement of all sometimes is . . . no transitional statement at all! Take that phrase out of the above email and see if it wouldn’t be just peachy without it. Often, less is more—translated: fewer words often means better writing.

So, with that being said {cough} . . . let me quit this piece while I’m behind.  Δ


[1] hackneyed (adj.): lacking in freshness or originality.

© 2018 by Dean Christensen. All rights reserved.