What’s So “Good” About Good Friday?

My own understanding of this holy day.

I suspect that many people—including the religious and nonreligious among us—are unclear as to why today is called “Good Friday.” Many folks at least vaguely realize it has some connection to Easter, that is has a “religious” meaning. But what makes it “good”? In some minds, it may be similar to Black Friday at Thanksgiving—a time to hit the stores (if they haven’t already done so) and pick up all the last-minute goodies for Easter festivities: food, candy, plastic eggs, new outfits, and so forth. For some (before COVID-19 and forced home-stays) it was “good” because they got the afternoon off from work with pay, or the day off from school. But none of these things has anything to do with its true meaning.

If you Google it, you can find a number of interesting explanations about the etymology of Good Friday. Here is the interpretation that I prefer: The church—meaning the collective body of people in the world who profess to believe in and follow Jesus Christ—has always understood that the greatest possible gift God bestowed upon humanity occurred on the day Christ was crucified on a cross nearly 2,000 years ago, the Friday of Passover week in c. 30 A.D.[1] This event in history, which occurred just outside of Jerusalem, is the sine qua non[2] of the gospel message.

Here is that gospel message in a nutshell, as most Christians understand it: “For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life” (John 3:16, KJV). The death of Jesus Christ on that day in 30 A.D. effected the forgiveness of and liberation from the enslavement of sin of every person who believes and places their trust in him, repents of (turns away from) sin, and walks by faith in him. And for nearly 2,000 years, that has resulted in the greatest possible “good” for the greatest number of people in the history of the world. It brought hope to the world, the promise of eternal life with God in heaven, and true spiritual freedom.

Freedom

Thank you, dear God, for the life and hope you gave us through the death—and three days later, on Easter Sunday, the resurrection—of our Savior Jesus Christ. During these fearful and uncertain days, we need this Good Friday message hope and forgiveness more than ever.

Happy Resurrection Day (Easter Sunday) to you and yours! I hope you will attend a church service online this Sunday where you can learn more about and celebrate the true meaning of Easter. Most evangelical churches will be live-streaming services.

May God bless us every one.


[1] Some Bible teachers suggest Christ was crucified on Thursday, an opinion not shared by the majority of Christian scholars.

[2] Sine qua non – literally, without which not. It something that is absolutely essential or indispensable – as the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus is indispensable to the gospel message, and, in turn, to the Christian faith.

Author: Dean Christensen

Educator, copyeditor, writer, baseball bug, word lover, book hound, guitar picker, classical music aficionado, classic rock 'n' roll and movie buff, sinner, saint, former this, used-to-be that, and future who-knows-what. Every day is an adventure in learning how to make the world a better place--grammatically, anyway.

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