Featured

Welcome to The Dean’s English Website and Blog

Often humorous, always educational, this website promotes the appreciation of standard written and spoken American English.

May your holiday season be filled with love, good cheer, and special times with family and friends.

Thanks for stopping by my website! My overarching goal is to celebrate and affirm standard written and spoken English and consequently promote clearer, more effective interpersonal communication. To that end, I’ve written blog posts and included other resources related to writing, language, grammar, words, usage, punctuation, and even pronunciation. For a few chuckles, check out the “Grammar Funnies” tab.

Why do I write this blog and manage this site? I’m an educator by nature and nurture and a lover of the English language. Some folks get a charge out of baking  or fishing or painting wall murals. I get energized by reading English-usage manuals and studying the why-fors and what-have-yous of grammar and punctuation. To use old colloquial expressions, I really dig this stuff. It floats my boat.

Please explore the pages in the menu above to learn about me, my copyediting services, and other resources.

All writers hope that people read and appreciate their writings. So I invite you to become a follower of this blog, to “like” it, to leave comments, and to contact me with English grammar and usage questions or ideas for future blog topics.

If you’re on Facebook, please “like” my The Dean’s English page there, too. (See the link on the right side of this page.)

And please share my website and individual blog articles with friends, family, business associates, and schoolmates. It will be the gift that keeps on giving.


Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

“You are fortunate because your language is English”

There is almost nothing you can’t do with it.

English

We native speakers of English are often guilty of taking jabs at our mother tongue—whether good-naturedly or otherwise—because of its many oddities and peculiarities. We sometimes forget that English is the international language of trade and commerce for reasons that go beyond the fact of America’s preeminence—and before that, the British Empire’s preeminence—on the world stage. English is an expressive, robust, flexible language that is relatively easy for non-native speakers to acquire and use with facility.

In my reading recently, I came across this quote on the exceptional nature of English. Although written seventy years ago, I believe it’s still relevant and worth sharing with you:

You are fortunate because your language is English. English is a great language; among the world’s languages it is perhaps the one that gives the individual the greatest freedom. It is poetic and practical at the same time; it is tremendously rich; it’s a sort of all-purpose language. One hundred years ago, the German writer Jakob Grimm wrote of English: “In wealth, good sense, and thrifty order no other of the living languages may be put beside it.” He was just one of the many foreigners who envy us our language; there is almost nothing you can’t do with it.[1]

I’m an advocate of learning foreign languages; I’ve formally studied several of them. If you haven’t done so, please do study another language, if for no other reason than to keep your mind nimble or to deepen your appreciation of a different culture. But remember: if you read or speak English, be humbly grateful. It is a great language.

[1] Rudolf Flesch, The Art of Readable Writing (New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1949), 206.

© 2019 by Dean Christensen. All rights reserved.

Ten Christmas Terms Explained

Do you know where all ten of these Christmas terms came from?

The Christmas season is “the most wonderful time of the year” for many of us. Just think of the many words we associate only with Christmas. The following ten words are among them. (This article first appeared in my blog three years ago.)

Advent Candles_31. Advent – Advent is derived from the Latin adventus, meaning “arrival” or “the coming.” By the end of the sixth century, Pope Gregory I had instituted in the Roman church the practice of conducting a special mass on each of the four Sundays leading up to “the coming” of the Christ-child. Similar to Lent, the season of Advent included fasting and penitence followed by a time of celebration. Eventually, the penitential nature of Advent gave way exclusively to the celebratory nature. Today, Advent is still celebrated in many churches, with each Sunday featuring a different theme, such as the prophecies of Jesus’ birth, the Annunciation to Mary, the visitation of the angels and shepherds, or the gifts of the wise men—with a candle lit for each theme. Continue reading “Ten Christmas Terms Explained”

Five Thanksgiving Words

Origins of common words.

As millions of Americans will be counting their blessings and gathering with family and friends to celebrate Thanksgiving Day this week, I thought it would be fun to investigate the origins of several words commonly associated with the holiday. Please enjoy this post first published on Thanksgiving Day two years ago.

1. Thank

Thank comes from the Old English word thanc, which is derived from the prehistoric Germanic thangk, with a root idea of thoughtfulness. The English word think comes from the samehappy-thanksgiving root. It’s easy to see how our word for expressing gratitude originated from the concept of thinking or giving thoughtful consideration. A twelfth-century translation of Matthew 15:19 reads, “From the heart come evil thanks.” By the early sixteenth century the same verse was rendered, “Out of the heart proceed evil thoughts” (KJV). To give thanks is to think about and express one’s gratitude for something. And what better way to say “thank you” than by enjoying a big feast. Continue reading “Five Thanksgiving Words”

When to Use Apostrophes to Make Words Plural

It takes 60 seconds. How will you do?

Test yourself on the following use of apostrophes. It will be easy for some, a challenge for others. (Answers are below.)

The Quiz

  1. Which is the correct way to write the photo caption?

  (a) Here we are at the restaurant with our friends the Johnson’s.

  (b) Here we are at the restaurant with our friends the Johnsons.

  1. Which is the correct way to sign the Christmas card?

  (a) Merry Christmas from the Zimbardos.

  (b) Merry Christmas from the Zimbardo’s.

  1. Which is correct?

  (a) We enjoy watching movies about superhero’s.

  (b) We enjoy watching movies about superheroes.

  1. Which is correct?

  (a) We had hamburgers and French fries for dinner.

  (b) We had hamburger’s and French fry’s for dinner.

  1. Which is correct?

  (a) It’s easy to use apostrophes correctly.

  (b) It’s easy to use apostrophe’s correctly.

The Rule

What’s the punctuation rule? Adding apostrophe + s does not make a word or a name plural. Leave the poor apostrophe out of it. Just don’t do it. Leave it!

But there is one exception to the rule: When writing the plural of a letter, it can be helpful—and is acceptable—to use an apostrophe. For example, “Mind your p’s and q’s“; “Mississippi has four s’s, three i’s, and two p’s.”

The Answers

How did you do? Here are the answers:

1: b    2: a    3: b    4: a    5: a

For further reading on the topic, see my article: Apostrophe Use and Misuse.


© 2018 by Dean Christensen. All rights reserved.

Meaningless, Lazy, Inflammatory, Taboo Words

Miscellaneous musings on our culture’s spoken and written language.

Meaningless Words

Facebook invited us to toss words into the dust bin when they created those cute little emoticons or emojis. Now, let me say from the get-go that I use those cute little emojis. I am a user. But what do they really mean? Like, Love, Haha, Wow, Sad, and Angry. The words—and underlying concepts—are virtually meaningless.

Hang onto your britches and let me explain. FB invites us to express supposed emotions with a single symbol, to save us the time and mental effort involved in using vocabulary to formulate sentences to express thoughtful replies. No need to do that when we can express displeasure by inserting an angry-face emoticon, or astonishment with a wow-face emoticon—when we may not feel anything like true anger or astonishment, in which case we’re conveying pseudo emotions. They’re not real.

Sometimes the feelings involved are deep and genuine—I’m not suggesting we’re all phonies on social media (but I think a lot of us are a lot more unreal there than we care to admit). Continue reading “Meaningless, Lazy, Inflammatory, Taboo Words”

Me, Myself, and I: Using These Pronouns Correctly

Are you using the correct pronouns?

“Would you like some ice cream?” asked Mother.

“Yippee! All three of us would!” cried six-year-old Dean.

“Three? I only see you.”

Dean - Me
Me

“Oh, no, there are three: me, myself, and I. That means three bowls of ice cream!”

“Oh,” she said, coughing once and rolling her eyes.

Thus began Dean’s disastrous, short-lived career as a stand-up comedian.

But seriously, folks—when do we use the pronouns me, myself, and I? Specifically, how do we properly use reflexive pronouns (myself, yourself, herself, ourselves, etc.)? Are they just another way of saying I/me, you, her, and us? Continue reading “Me, Myself, and I: Using These Pronouns Correctly”

“With That Being Said”: An Annoying Expression

Category: Annoying Expressions

Here’s how an email sent to all employees recently began:

Wow! July is right around the corner. With that being said, attached is the July newsletter for you to read and share. 

“With that being said”? Huh?

It may be too kind to label “with that being said” as a cliché, but it is that at least. It should be labeled a hackneyed term,[1] or better yet, a nuisance. But because I want to be polite, I’ll call it a cliché, and it’s been around for a long time—many years. But lately it seems to be cropping up all over the place. Writers and speakers use it as a ready-made, no-bake transitional statement, along with its shorter cousins “having said that” and “that said.” It’s intended use is to smoothly shift gears from one sentence or one topic to the next, to shoehorn the reader (or listener) into what’s to follow. It’s a throwaway expression, a space-filler, and it generally adds nothing of substance to one’s communications.

I’m picking on this cliché because of its frequent use in formal contexts—where the communicator has prepared an oral presentation, a paper, or a correspondence like the above email, in which careful thought was allegedly required. So what can we use to transition from one thought to the next without using this trite expression? Here are a ten examples of common transitional expressions. Which one (or more) of these might work better than “with that being said”?

equally important

in the same way

as a result

consequently

for this reason

therefore

hence

in any event

meanwhile

however

And perhaps the best transitional statement of all sometimes is . . . no transitional statement at all! Take that phrase out of the above email and see if it wouldn’t be just peachy without it. Often, less is more—translated: fewer words frequently means better writing.

So, with that being said {cough} . . . let me quit this piece while I’m behind.  Δ


[1] hackneyed (adj.): lacking in freshness or originality.

© 2018 by Dean Christensen. All rights reserved.